Sag, Tension and Weight

To vary the experience on longlines, you can do more than just add more length. You can play with sag, tension and weight. Remember the characteristics of webbing we discussed in the previous article about webbing? Play with different tensions so you can experience lines with different amounts of sag. Natural dips in the terrain are a great way to increase sag and rig longer lines without having the anchors super high above the ground.

To throw in a new dynamic, add webbing or rope by taping it to your slackline. Only the top webbing is tensioned.

To throw in a new dynamic, add webbing or rope by taping it to your slackline. Only the top webbing is tensioned.

An equasion to estimate the tension in the line when you are standing on it.

An equasion to estimate the tension in the line when you are standing on it.

Another great way to diversify longlining is to add weight by doubling or tripling up your webbing. In longlines, doubled up webbing can be done by just loading the weblock with two layers of webbing. Simply treat your doubled up webbing as one piece and load it as usual. This increases the mass of the line and makes it harder to control, try keeping the bottom webbing looser than the walking webbing. Great training if you have two pieces of webbing or one long piece and no place to rig it to its full length. You can also replace the second piece of webbing with a piece of rope. Simply tie the rope off to either end and tape the rope to the webbing. Every 6 ft is a good spacing for tape. You can even start experimenting with slider tapes. Slider tapes make it so you can move the rope and webbing independent from each other. This requires at least one side of the tape having no adhesive contact with the rope. Many ways exist to accomplish this.


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