Webbing Anchors

Connecting your webbing to the anchors is one of the more critical steps in the rigging process. This is because it is at this point where the webbing is most likely to fail. There are a few methods to do this and we’ll discuss them below.

RingLock/ LineLock

A ring lock is similar to a linelock but using more burley hardware. Instead of a small chainlink, two 1 ½” rings are used and where the oval carabiner is in a linelock, a shackle is used. It is also common to thread the 1” webbing with 1 ½” tubular webbing to protect the webbing from pinching and abrasion while simultaneously increasing the bend radius of the webbing while in the ringlock. We change up the hardware pieces used because longlines are often taken to much higher tensions than primitive systems. Bend radius is an important point to mention because it plays a huge role in webbing strength retention.The smaller the bend radius the more stress the webbing is experiencing (more info can be found at the reference link below) The most significant downside to this method is that you cannot adjust the webbing once its set. This can be kind of a bummer at times.

RingLock with webbing backed up around tree.

RingLock with webbing backed up around tree.

WebLock

A weblock is a piece of hardware specifically designed to hold slackline webbing. There are a variety of weblocks available on the market but their functions are almost entirely the same. A bite of webbing is loaded into the device, wrapped around the diverter and pin inserted through the bite and pinholes of the device. This creates a very strong connection point for the webbing. Weblocks were designed to maintain maximum strength of the webbing while increasing the versatility of the connector. Weblocks are much easier to use than ringlocks because they allow you to adjust the webbing after its loaded in the device. Taking slack out of the system before tensioning with the pulleys is called “pretensioning”.

Two different styles of webbing anchor.

Two different styles of webbing anchor.


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